El objetivo de la generación de leads no es simplemente obtener un cliente potencial en forma de registro de datos, como en un sorteo. El objetivo real es conseguir un nuevo cliente que esté interesado en el producto X o en el servicio Y, y que esté "listo para la venta". Se trata de un lead cualificado (qualified lead), que muy probablemente se convertirá en un nuevo cliente porque tiene una motivación específica y no quiere ganar nada.
¿Qué pensarías si te digo que la generación de leads comenzó hace 6,000 años en Mesopotamia?. Increíble ¿No? Pues durante ese tiempo la tribu Mesopotamica inventó una forma de intercambiar bienes y servicios mediante el intercambio de té, especias, alimentos, armas e incluso cráneos humanos. Esto se denominó más tarde sistema de trueque. El dinero no existía entonces. Pero incluso después de que nació el dinero, el sistema de trueque no murió.

Emails triggered by milestones, like anniversaries and birthdays, are fun to get -- who doesn't like to celebrate a special occasion? The beauty of anniversary emails, in particular, is that they don't require subscribers to input any extra data, and they can work for a variety of senders. Plus, the timeframe can be modified based on the business model.


In the case of cost per mille/click, the publisher is not concerned about whether a visitor is a member of the audience that the advertiser tries to attract and is able to convert because at this point the publisher has already earned his commission. This leaves the greater, and, in case of cost per mille, the full risk and loss (if the visitor cannot be converted) to the advertiser.
In addition to linking to Letter Shoppe's designs (available on merchandise that is ultimately sold by RedBubble), the email campaign includes an endearing quote by the Featured Artist: "Never compromise on your values, and only do work you want to get more of." RedBubble's customers are likely to agree -- and open other emails in this campaign for more inspiring quotes.
Spam is the biggest threat to organic search engines, whose goal is to provide quality search results for keywords or phrases entered by their users. Google's PageRank algorithm update ("BigDaddy") in February 2006—the final stage of Google's major update ("Jagger") that began in mid-summer 2005—specifically targeted spamdexing with great success. This update thus enabled Google to remove a large amount of mostly computer-generated duplicate content from its index.[33] 
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